Title

Childrens recognition of caricatures

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Psychology

RAS ID

165

Comments

Originally published as: Chang, P. P., Levine, S. C., & Benson, P. J. (2002). Children's recognition of caricatures. Developmental Psychology, 38(6), 1038. Original article available here.

Abstract

This study examined children's and adults' perception and recognition of facial stimuli that were either systematically exaggerated (caricatures) or de-exaggerated (anticaricatures) relative to a norm face. The results showed that all age groups perceived caricatures as the most distinctive versions of a face and anticaricatures as the least distinctive, although the effect was smallest for 6-year-olds. In general, caricatures were identified as quickly as the veridical faces and faster than the anticaricatures. Across all age groups, participants' familiarity with the stimulus faces interacted with degree of caricature to determine speed of processing as well as choice of best likeness. The results are discussed in relation to the idea that distinctiveness information in a face is represented in relation to a norm. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

DOI

10.1037/0012-1649.38.6.1038

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1037/0012-1649.38.6.1038