Title

Cleavage Luminescence from Silicon

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

IEEE

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Computer and Information Science

RAS ID

176

Comments

This article was originally published as: Li, D., & Watson, A. C. (2002). Cleavage luminescence from silicon. Proceedings of Optoelectronic and Microelectronic Materials and Devices 2000. COMMAD 2000. (pp. 242-245). Piscataway, New Jersey: IEEE. Original article available here

Abstract

This paper reports on further research into the structure and properties of the cleaved surfaces of silicon, using vacuum cleavage luminescence detection methods. The experiments involved detecting the luminescence produced by cleaving thin silicon plates within a high vacuum, by a process of converting the luminescence to an amplified electrical signal. The experiments were based on the assumption that surface cleavage and reconstruction may cause electrons to become excited, and the resulting recombination process which involves the combining of an electron in the conduction band with a hole in the valence band, would result in an emission of energy that would be detectable. This hypothesis was supported by simple calculations that predicted that every broken atomic bond on a silicon surface should radiate one photon, thus generating a strong detectable emission signal.

DOI

10.1109/COMMAD.2000.1022937

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1109/COMMAD.2000.1022937