Title

Cyberbullying Versus Face-to-Face Bullying: A Theoretical and Conceptual Review

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Hogrefe Publishing

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science, Child Health Promotion Research Centre

RAS ID

8600

Comments

This article was originally published as: Dooley, J. J., Pyzalski, J., & Cross, D. S. (2009). Cyberbullying versus Face-to-Face Bullying: A Theoretical and Conceptual Review. Journal of Psychology, 217(4), 182-188. Original article available here

Abstract

Cyberbullying has been described as a type of electronic bullying and has recently been subjected to intense media scrutiny largely due to a number of high profile and tragic cases of teen suicide. Despite the media attention relatively little is known about the nature of cyberbullying. This is, at least in part, due to a lack of theoretical and conceptual clarity and an examination of the similarities and differences between cyberbullying and face-to-face bullying. This paper reviews the limited theoretical and empirical literature addressing both cyberbullying and face-to-face bullying, using some specific examples from a qualitative study for illustration. We compare and contrast individual factors common to cyber and face-to-face bullying. We then examine social information processing factors associated with face-to-face bullying and present a discussion of the similarities and differences that may characterize cyberbullying.

DOI

10.1027/0044-3409.217.4.182

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1027/0044-3409.217.4.182