Title

Measuring Ideal and Real Self-Concept on the Same Scale, Based on a Multifaceted, Hierarchical Model of Self-Concept

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Faculty

Community Services, Education and Social Sciences

School

Education

RAS ID

1079

Comments

This article was originally published as: Waugh, R. F. (2001). Measuring ideal and real self-concept on the same scale, based on a multifaceted, hierarchical model of self-concept. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 61(1), 85-101. Original article available here

Abstract

Self-concept was conceptualized as composed of three first-order facets, each with three second-order facets, with ideal and real aspects: academic self-concept (capability, achievement, and confidence), social self-concept (same-sex peer, opposite-sex peer, and family), and self-concept presentation of self (personal confidence, physical, and honest/trustworthy). Data from a convenience sample of 400 university students were analyzed with the extended logistic model of Rasch. The 45 real items, together with 21 ideal items (66 items), fit the model and formed a scale with valid and reliable (r = .94) scores. The ideal items were all “easier” than their corresponding real items. This supported a multifaceted, hierarchical model of self-concept, with ideal and real aspects making an unequal contribution, as an ordered unidimensional latent trait.

DOI

10.1177/00131640121971086

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1177/00131640121971086