Title

Primary Connections interim research report No. 4: Professional learning facilitators’ confidence and self-efficacy at the end of Term 1, 2006

Document Type

Report

Publisher

Australian Academy of Science

Place of Publication

Canberra

Faculty

Community Services, Education and Social Sciences

School

Education

Comments

This article was originally published as: Hackling, M. W. (2006). Primary Connections interim research report No. 4: Professional learning facilitators’ confidence and self-efficacy at the end of Term 1, 2006. Canberra: Australian Academy of Science.

Abstract

Of the 72 professional learning facilitators (PLFs) who completed the end of Term 1 survey, 38 were teachers while 43 were not based in schools. The self-efficacy scores were generally high. Gains in self efficacy as professional learning facilitators achieved through the January workshop have been maintained to the end of Term 1 despite many PLFs not having had the opportunity to practice facilitation by delivering workshops. The PLFs had relatively high confidence for all aspects of facilitation surveyed. Teacher PLFs had lowest confidence with assessment and non school-based PLFs had lowest confidence with coordinating a science program. Gains made in confidence through the January workshop had been maintained to the end of Term 1. The most common professional learning activities conducted in Term 1 were sharing resources and experiences, answering questions about the program and gaining the support of the principal. Classroom teachers more frequently taught PC, observed colleagues teaching PC, invited a colleague to observe them teaching PC and advocated with the principal than other PLFs. The other PLFs more frequently visited schools to see how PC was being implemented, presented information sessions for a group of principals or to district or sector policy makers, leaders or consultants. The PLFs presented 28 workshops in Term 1 and they planned to present 46 more workshops during the year. Most workshops were the Introduction to Primary Connections workshop. Most PLFs modified the professional learning resources to suit the local context. Suggestions for modifying the professional learning resources included breaking the one-day Introduction to Primary Connections workshop into smaller modules and adding more work samples. Key factors influencing PLFs’ effectiveness in their roles include support from their line manager, having access to quality resources, schools’ interest in the program, time to present workshops and availability of time in schools for staff to attend workshops, and access to curriculum units for workshops.

This document is currently not available here.

 
COinS