Title

Attitudes to multiculturalism, immigration and cultural diversity: Comparison of dominant and non-dominant groups in three Australian states

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

Psychology & Social Science

RAS ID

10631

Comments

This article was originally published as: Dandy, J. K., & Pe-Pua, R. (2010). Attitudes to multiculturalism, immigration and cultural diversity: Comparison of dominant and non-dominant groups in three Australian states. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 34(1), 34-46. NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in International Journal of Intercultural Relations. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 34, 1, (2010) DOI#” .

Abstract

This paper presents research on the attitudes to multiculturalism,immigration, and cultural diversity ofdominant andnon-dominant groupsin three Australian states.The studyutilized an adaptation of the original International Study of Attitudes toward Immigration and Settlement (ISATIS) instrument developed by John Berry and colleagues. Results from our quantitative and qualitative datademonstrated favorable attitudes toward cultural diversity and support formulticulturalismamongst the Australians in oursample, in general.Women, immigrants and non-dominant cultural groups held more positive attitudes than men, nonimmigrants and dominant groups for some dimensions. Consistent with previous Australian research, there was evidence of attitudinal ambivalence, with participants expressing concerns about the perceived negative consequences of cultural diversity. Participants also expressed negative attitudes toward particular outgroups, such as Muslims and Arabs. The results are discussed in terms of the complex nature of multiculturalism attitudes and the need to examine these in a variety of contexts.

DOI

10.1016/j.ijintrel.2009.10.003

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1016/j.ijintrel.2009.10.003