Title

Role of Transcription Factors in Cell Replacement Therapies for Neurodegenerative Conditions

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Future Medicine Ltd.

Faculty

Computing, Health and Science

School

ECU Health & Wellness Institute

RAS ID

10597

Comments

This article was originally published as: Thomas, M. (2010). Role of transcription factors in cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative conditions. Regenerative Medicine , 5(3), 441-450. Original article available here

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurological condition, behind dementia, for which there is currently no cure. A promising curative treatment approach is cell replacement therapy, which involves the introduction of new dopaminergic cells into a degenerative Parkinson’s disease brain. The future progression of this field into a clinically viable treatment option is reliant on generating replacement dopaminergic cells. Furthermore, as the ability of transplanted dopaminergic neurons to form connections with host tissue is dependent on where the cells are derived from, the replacement dopaminergic cells will need to be phenotypically similar to substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons. This article focuses on how developmental transcription factors have been utilized to assist the progression of stem cell therapies for Parkinson’s disease. Key transcription factor-mediated stages of substantia nigra dopaminergic neuronal development is described in the belief that a comprehensive understanding of this specific dopaminergic differentiation pathway is necessary for the progression of successful cell therapies for Parkinson’s disease.

DOI

10.2217/rme.10.17

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.2217/rme.10.17