Title

Fear, anxiety and the state of terror.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Routledge

Faculty

Education and Arts, Computer and Security Science

School

Communication & Arts, Centre for Research in Entertainment, Arts,Technology, Education and Communications

RAS ID

10128

Funders

Australian Research Council

Grant Number

ARC Number : DP0559707

Comments

This article was originally published as: Aly, A. , & Green, L. R. (2010). Fear, anxiety and the state of terror. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, 33(3), 268-281. Original article available here

Abstract

There is no internationally accepted, unitary definition of terrorism. A brief review of the literature reveals over 100 definitions.1 The League of Nations defines terrorism as “criminal acts directed against a state [. . .] intended or calculated to create a state of terror in the minds of particular persons, group of persons or general public.” In the United States it is defined variously as the unlawful use of force or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce in furtherance of political or social objectives. The United Kingdom defines it as “the use of violence for political ends and includes any use of violence for the purpose of putting the public or any section of the public in fear.” In Australia, terrorism is defined by the Australian Defence Force as the “use or threatened use of violence for political ends or for the purpose of putting the public or any section of the public in fear.”

DOI

10.1080/10576100903555796

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1080/10576100903555796