Title

Single-leg cycle training is superior to double-leg cycling in improving the oxidative potential and metabolic profile of trained skeletal muscle

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

American Physiology Society

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

RAS ID

12630

Comments

This article was originally published as: Abbiss, C. , Karagounis, L., Laursen, P. B., Peiffer, J., Martin, D., Hawley, J., Fatehee, N. , & Martin, J. (2011). Single-leg cycle training is superior to double-leg cycling in improving the oxidative potential and metabolic profile of trained skeletal muscle. Journal of Applied Physiology, 110(5), 1248-1255. Original article available here

Abstract

Single leg cycling may enhance the peripheral adaptations of skeletal muscle to a greater magnitude than double leg cycling. The purpose of the current study was to determine the influence of 3 wk high-intensity single leg and double leg cycle training on markers of oxidative potential and muscle metabolism and exercise performance. In a crossover design, nine trained cyclists (78 ± 7 kg, VO2max: 59 ± 5 ml.kg-1.min-1) performed an incremental cycling test and a 16 km cycling time trial before and after 3 wk of double leg and counterweighted single leg cycle training (2 training sessions per wk). Training involved either 3 (double) or 6 (single) maximal 4 min intervals with 6 min recovery. Mean power output during the single leg intervals (198 ± 29W) was more than half that of the double leg intervals (344 ± 38W; P<0.05). Skeletal muscle biopsy samples obtained from the vastus lateralis revealed a training-induced increase in phosphorylated AMPKαT172 for both groups (P<0.05). However, there was a greater increase in cytochrome c oxidase subunits II (COX II) and IV (COX IV) and GLUT-4 protein concentration following single compared with double leg cycling (P<0.05). Training-induced improvements in VO2max:(3.9 ± 6.2% vs 0.6 ± 3.6%) and time trial performance (1.3 ± 0.5% vs 2.3 ± 4.2%) were similar following both interventions. We conclude that short-term high-intensity single leg cycle training can elicit greater enhancement in the metabolic and oxidative potential of skeletal muscle compared with traditional double leg cycling. Single leg cycling may therefore provide a valuable training stimulus for trained and clinical populations.

DOI

10.1152/japplphysiol.01247.2010

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1152/japplphysiol.01247.2010