Title

Effects of Running Velocity on Running Kinetics and Kinematics

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

12427

Comments

This article was originally published as: Brughelli, M. , Cronin, J. B., & Chaouachi, A. (2011). Effects of running velocity on running kinetics and kinematics. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 25(4), 933-939. Original article available here

Abstract

Sixteen semiprofessional Australian football players performed running bouts at incremental velocities of 40, 60, 80, and 100% of their maximum velocity on a Woodway nonmotorized force treadmill. As running velocity increased from 40 to 60%, peak vertical and peak horizontal forces increased by 14.3% (effect size [ES] = 1.0) and 34.4% (ES = 4.2), respectively. The changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 60 to 80% were 1.0% (ES = 0.05) and 21.0% (ES = 2.9), respectively. Finally, the changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 80% to maximum were 2.0% (ES = 0.1) and 24.3% (ES = 3.4). In addition, both stride frequency and stride length significantly increased with each incremental velocity (p < 0.05). Conversely, contact times and the vertical displacement of the center of mass significantly decreased with increased running velocity (p < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was found between horizontal force and maximum running velocity (r = 0.47). For the kinematic variables, only stride length was found to have a significant positive correlation with maximum running velocity (r = 0.66). It would seem that increasing maximal sprint velocity may be more dependent on horizontal force production as opposed to vertical force production

DOI

10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181c64308

 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181c64308