Title

Different forms of bullying and victimization: Bully-victims versus bullies and victims

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Routledge

Faculty

Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences/Child Health Promotion Research Centre

RAS ID

17411

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Developmental Psychology on 10 May 2013 as: Yang, A., & Salmivalli, C. (2013). Different forms of bullying and victimization: Bully-victims versus bullies and victims. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 10(6), 723-738. Available online here

Abstract

Although much is known about bully-victims, children who bully others and are victimized by others, the forms of bullying they employ and experience have received little attention. The present study examined the extent to which bully-victims (in comparison to pure bullies and pure victims) are perpetrators and targets of verbal, physical, indirect, and cyber bullying. The sample included 19,869 students from grades 1 to 8 (7 to 15 years of age). Bully-victims (whether identified by self- or peer-reports) perpetrated significantly more physical and verbal bullying than pure bullies. They also tended to score higher than bullies in cyberbullying, but not in indirect bullying. With respect to victimization, bully-victims were more frequent targets of all four forms of victimization than pure victims. The frequent victimization experiences of bully-victims may be one factor contributing to their high maladjustment reported in the literature. Challenges for teacher training and bullying interventions are discussed.

DOI

10.1080/17405629.2013.793596

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