Title

Investigation of the relationship between low environmental exposure to metals and bone mineral density, bone resorption and renal function

Document Type

Article

Publisher

Urban und Fischer Verlag Jena

RAS ID

20559

Comments

Originally published as: Callan, A.C., Devine, A., Qi, L., Ng, J.C., Hinwood, A.L. (2015). Investigation of the relationship between low environmental exposure to metals and bone mineral density, bone resorption and renal function in International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, 218(5), 444-451. Available here.

Abstract

Environmental exposure to metals has been linked to adverse health outcomes. Exposure to cadmium has been associated with decreased bone density, an increased risk of osteoporotic fracture and possible renal dysfunction. Older women are a group at risk of renal and bone density impacts and exposure to metals may be an important risk factor for these health outcomes. This study was a cross sectional study of 77 women aged 50 years and above examining the relationship between metals exposure and renal and bone health. Urinary and blood metals concentrations, plasma creatinine, iron, ferritin and transferrin were measured in these subjects. Bone biomarkers assessed included the pyridinium crosslinks, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline measured by ELISA. Renal function was assessed using eGFR and KIM-1. Whole body, hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density was assessed using DEXA. Blood and urinary metals concentrations were generally low in the subjects, with a median urinary cadmium concentration of 0.26. μg/g creatinine (range

DOI

10.1016/j.ijheh.2015.03.010