Title

Infant nutrition and maternal obesity influence the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adolescents

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier

Place of Publication

Denmark

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

24693

Comments

Originally published: Ayonrinde, O. T., Oddy, W. H., Adams, L. A., Mori, T. A., Beilin, L. J., de Klerk, N., & Olynyk, J. K. (2017). Infant nutrition and maternal obesity influence the risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adolescents. Journal of Hepatology. 67(3), 568-576. Available here.

Abstract

Background & Aims The pathway to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adolescents may have its origins in adiposity gains, nutrition and sedentary lifestyle established during childhood. There is inadequate knowledge regarding the associations between infant nutrition and subsequent NAFLD. We examined the association of maternal factors and infant nutrition, with the subsequent diagnosis of NAFLD in adolescents. Methods Adolescents aged 17 years in the Western Australian Pregnancy (Raine) Cohort study had fatty liver assessment using liver ultrasound. Prospectively recorded data on maternal pregnancy and infant feeding were examined against a NAFLD outcome during late adolescence. Results NAFLD was diagnosed in 15.2% of the 1,170 adolescents examined. Ninety-four percent had been breastfed as infants. The duration of breastfeeding before starting supplementary milk was ⩾4 months in 54.4% and ⩾6 months in 40.6%. Breastfeeding without supplementary milk ⩾6 months (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43–0.94, p = 0.02), maternal pre-pregnancy obesity (adjusted OR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.21–4.32, p = 0.01) and adolescent obesity (adjusted OR: 9.08; 95% CI: 6.26–13.17, p

DOI

10.1016/j.jhep.2017.03.029

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