Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier B.V.

Place of Publication

United Kingdom

School

School of Science / Mine Water and Environment Research Centre

RAS ID

23110

Comments

Originally published as: Blanchette, M. L., & Lund, M. A. (2016). Pit lakes are a global legacy of mining: an integrated approach to achieving sustainable ecosystems and value for communities. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 23, 28-34. Available here.

Abstract

The impact of large-scale mining on the landscape is a permanent legacy of industrialisation and unique to the Anthropocene. Thousands of lakes created from the flooding of abandoned open-cut mines occur across every inhabited continent and many of these lakes are toxic, posing risks to adjacent communities and ecosystems. Sustainable plans to improve water quality and biodiversity in ‘pit lakes’ do not exist due to: (1) confusion as to the ultimate use of these lakes, (2) involvement of ecologists only after the lake is filled and (3) pit lake ecology struggling to reach the primary literature. An integrated approach to pit lake management engages ecologists in pit lake design, prioritising ecological progress and passive treatment in mine closure planning, ultimately empowering communities with post-mining options.

DOI

10.1016/j.cosust.2016.11.012

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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