Title

The impact of motivated volunteerism on peer-mentoring educational programs: Evidence from Western Australia

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publisher

Jason Thomas Events Pty Ltd

School

School of Arts and Humanities

RAS ID

23100

Comments

Originally published as: Adusei-Asante, K., & Doh, D. (2017, July). The impact of motivated volunteerism on peer-mentoring educational programs: Evidence from Western Australia. Paper presented at the Students Transitions Achievement, Retention & Success (STARS) Conference, Adelaide, Australia. Original paper available here

Abstract

Volunteerism is a longstanding practice, known to provide benefits to both the volunteer - in terms of skills acquisition, employment opportunities and general life satisfaction - and the host institution. However, the sustainability of volunteerism is being questioned in the face of evidence that people seem to be losing interest. Within the context of social exchange theory, this paper discusses the impact of motivated volunteerism on the outcomes of a peer-mentoring programme aimed at improving retention and educational outcomes for domestic African undergraduate students in higher education at Edith Cowan University, Western Australia. We argue that peer-mentoring educational programmes modelled on paid volunteerism achieve good outcomes for mentors and their mentees.

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