Title

Differences in end range of motion vertical jump kinetic and kinematic strategies between trained weightlifters and elite short track speed skaters

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

NSCA National Strength and Conditioning Association

Faculty

Health, Engineering and Science

School

School of Exercise and Health Sciences

RAS ID

21564

Comments

This article was originally published as: Haug, W. B., Spratford, W., Williams, K. J., Chapman, D. W., Drinkwater, E. J., Haug, W. B., & Leverrier Street, B. (2015). Differences in End Range of Motion Vertical Jump Kinetic and Kinematic Strategies between Trained Weightlifters and Elite Short Track Speed Skaters. Journal of strength and conditioning research. 29(9) 2488-2496. Original article available here

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to identify differences in end range of motion (ROM) kinetic and kinematic strategies between highly resistance and vertical jump-trained athletes and controls. Weightlifters (WL: n 4), short track speed skaters (STSS: n 5), and nonresistance-trained controls (C: n 6) performed 6 standing vertical squat jumps (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ) without external resistance. Jump testing was performed using 3-dimensional marker trajectories captured with a 15-camera motion analysis system synchronized with 2 in-ground force plates. During SJ, there were large effects for the difference in time before toe off of peak vertical velocity between WL to STSS and C (ES: -1.43; ES: -1.73, respectively) and for the decrease between peak and toe off vertical velocity (ES: -1.28; ES: -1.71, respectively). During CMJ, there were large effects for the difference in time before toe off of peak vertical velocity between WL to STSS and C (ES: -1.28; ES: -1.53, respectively) and for decrease between peak and toe off vertical velocity (ES: -1.03; ES: -1.59, respectively). Accompanying these differences for both jump types were large effects for time of joint deceleration before toe off for all lower body joints between WL compared with C with large effects between WL and STSS at the hip and between STSS and C at the ankle. These findings suggest that the end ROM kinetic and kinematic strategy used during jumping is group-specific in power-trained athletes, with WL exhibiting superior strategies as compared with resistance- and jump-trained STSS.

DOI

10.1519/JSC.0000000000000889

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