Date of Award

1998

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Faculty

Faculty of Communications, Health and Science

Abstract

There lacks coherent and persuasive rationales for the further development of computer-based, interactive educational materials, for tertiary settings. Indeed, educational software arising out of what might be coined the “multimedia era”, namely the mid and later 19902, has been marked by lacklustre products with an emphasis in development and evaluation placed largely on technological issues (such as the use of video, sound and animations). As such, the rapid increase in commercially available (usually CD based) products has generally met a cool adoption from academics and educationalists, with both these groups often bemoaning the paucity or non-existence of effective instructional design models for the use of “new media” in teaching and learning, based in clearly delineated constructs that derive their substance from theoretical models and research findings. This research programme was intended to explore one such rationale.

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