Date of Award

2016

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

School

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA)

First Advisor

Dr Jonathan Paget

Second Advisor

Dr Lindsay Vickery

Abstract

Extended techniques are integral to the creation and interpretation of works for the bass clarinet. Effects such as multiphonics, microtones, or percussive and air sounds, have become commonplace in repertoire from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This PhD dissertation posits that the bass clarinet’s affinity for these sounds can be traced back to the instrument’s earliest uses, and thus extended techniques should be central to the understanding of the bass clarinet. While there is a large knowledge-base of these techniques, the paradigm of print resources with accompanying music media in which it is catalogued is old-fashioned and inefficient. This project centres around the creation of a digital resource (an iPad application) that allows performers and composers access to this body of information in a format that is portable, powerful, and intuitive. It strives to organise the information in more efficient and useful ways, to present it elegantly, and to facilitate quick and intelligent methods of retrieval. The app can also be used as an educative tool enabling performers and composers to more quickly obtain mastery of this material. The efficacy of the app is demonstrated through a lecture recital and accompanying exegetical discussion explicating the ways that the app can add (or could have added) value in the composition, notation, learning, and performance of the works presented.

Access Note

Access to this thesis - is restricted to the thesis exegesis by author's request

Share

 
COinS