Date of Award

2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (Environmental Management)

School

School Of Natural Sciences

Faculty

Computing, Health And Science

First Advisor

Prof. Paul Lavery

Second Advisor

Dr. Glenn Hyndes

Third Advisor

Dr. Christina Hanson

Abstract

Nutrient inputs from productive marine environments have been shown to directly and indirectly subsidise primary producers and consumers in terrestrial ecosystems (e.g. Polis and Hurd 1995; 1996; Anderson and Polis 1998; 1999). But does this theory hold true on islands surrounded by oligotrophic waters, which account for a significant proportion of the marine environment? The aim of the present study was to examine the applicability of the spatial subsidisation hypotheses proposed by Polis and his co-authors to an oligotrophic system in south-western region of Western Australia. These aims were achieved by comparing soil and plant nutrients, and the nitrogen stable isotope signatures of soil, plants, detritus and invertebrates in areas with (islands) and without (mainland sites) inputs from seabirds. In addition, the responses of plant nutrients and vegetation assemblages to guano additions were examined in a controlled field experiment.

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Aug 11 2010

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