Date of Award

2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science

School

School Of Natural Sciences

Faculty

Computing, Health And Science

First Advisor

Dr. Paul Lavery

Second Advisor

Dr. Nick Gales

Abstract

In order to define small and large scale spatial and temporal individual movement patterns of dugongs (Dugong dugon) within the Shark Bay World Heritage Property (SBWHP) a total of 19 dugongs were fitted with remote location recording and transmitting devices. Combined locations from all units totalled over 10,000 locations. This spatial and temporal data was used to define movement patterns of dugongs within Shark Bay as well as areas of high use deemed to be indicative of foraging activity. Platform Transmitting Terminals (PTT?s) using the ARGOS location collection system tracked animals over large temporal scales with 4 animals tracked up to periods of 11 months. Using these instruments it was possible accurately define a previously identified large-scale seasonal movement pattern within the confines of Shark Bay. These four animals showed distinct seasonal home ranges defined by changes in Sea Surface Temperature.

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