Date of Award

1-1-2002

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Faculty

Faculty of Communications, Health and Science

First Advisor

Associate Professor Brian Shoesmith

Second Advisor

Dr Rod Giblett

Abstract

The core of this thesis is that radio remains an important communication tool for tribal communities living In remote hill areas of South India. Some of the more salient findings relate to media uses and preferences ot people, suggesting that sophisticated negotiations take place between audiences and media. These Include suspicion of television and its impact upon work practices and education, the organization of time and space to accommodate radio and television Into people's busy daily lives, and the recognition that radio may be a more Innovative medium than television. These conclusions have been reached from an In- depth qualitative audience ethnographic study of three tribal communities in Southern India. The Toda, Kola and Kannikaran are tribal communities living in Tamil Nadu, South India. The Toda and Kota live in the Nilgiri Hills. The Kannlkaran live in Kanyakumari district, the most Southern lip of India.

Included in

Radio Commons

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