Date of Award

1-1-2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

School

School of Biomedical and Sports Science

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

First Advisor

Associate Professor Barry Gibson

Abstract

This research has examined players' and coaches' perceptions of the specific leadership behaviours of soccer coaches. The research was comprised two studies, the first a quantitative study and the second a qualitative study. Both studies focused on researching Yuki's (1989, 1994) 14 specific leadership behaviours. These are: (a) team building and conflict management, (b) developing, (c) supporting, (d) rewarding, (e) recognising, (I) motivating and inspiring, {g) delegating. (h) consulting, (i) problem solving, (j) planning, (k) monitoring, (1) clarifying, (m) informing, and (n) networking. Subjects for Study I were 400 randomly selected soccer players and 40 randomly selected soccer coaches. The ratio between the players and the coaches was 10:1. Results of the MANOVA revealed significant multivariate differences between players' and coaches’ perceptions of coaches' behaviours. The univariate ANOVAs revealed that Coaches' and players' perceptions differed significantly on ten of the 14 specific behaviours. The MANOVA results showed significant multivariate difference between players' perceptions and the coaches' years of experience. The univariate ANOVAs test revealed that players' perceptions differed significantly on eight specific behaviours. The results of Bonferroni adjusted t tests indicated that there was a statistically significant difference between players' perceptions of their coaches' behaviours. Results of the MANOVA revealed significant multivariate difference in players' perceptions of their coaches' behaviours and the level of competition. The univariate ANOVAs test revealed that 13 specific behaviours were statistically significant. Results of the MANOVA showed significant multivariate difference between male and female players. The univariate ANOVAs test indicates that players' perceptions differ significantly on six specific behaviours. Results oft he MANOVA revealed significant multivariate difference between junior and senior players. The univariate ANOVAs test indicated that only delegating is significant at the 0.001 level.

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