Title

Su Dansi - Dance film

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Output Type

Original Creative Work

Director(s)

Jo Omodei

School

Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA)

Comments

The makers of this film would like to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which su dansi was filmed, the Whadjuk people of the Noongar nation. We recognise their continuing connection to land, culture and story and the value in which water, and all the elements, is inextricably bound to the physical, spiritual and cultural identity of all Australians.

Description

From the rocking of waves in the ocean, the surge of a current, a droplet of rain to the pouring of water into a glass. Water has so much potential to move, so much so that it can be viewed as having its own organic dance: its own organic choreography. Water has the ability to moisten, purify, and soak. It is transparent, fluid and shapeless. In some circumstances it is soft and calm, in other instances, fierce and strong. Drinking water can quench our thirst and clear our minds; it can relieve our skin, soak our body. Being in it or near it can transform water and the body into one entity, one being. When viewing the relationship between the dancing body and water through the art of film, endless movement and choreographic potential arises. In doing so, I suggest that we can think about natural elements and dance differently and appreciate natural elements, more specifically, water, on a more-than human level.

su dansi is a celebration of our tactile, emotional and deeply human response to water that makes us realise that we are not separate to the earth, rather one entity. Through the investigation of a natural element such as water, I hope to assist the audience to view the natural elements and the landscapes they inhabit as a new dancing entity, whether independent from, or in relation to the human body. Indeed, landscapes are made up of a heterogeneous collection of elements, ecologies and organisms. This can form a direct correlation with how choreography, either as a choreographed work or process, can consist of a diverse collection of dance elements such as body, energy, space and time.

Additional Information

Artistic Director: Jo Omodei

Director of Photography: Jacob Morgan- de Laine

Dancers: Giorgia Schijf, Bethany Reece, Emily Coles, Alexandra Kay, Tessa Gisby, Emily Tuckwell, Thomas Mullane

Producer: Michael Breeze

Composer: Abbey Bradstreet

Cinematographer: Kaifu Deng

Editor: Alexandra Ashton

Drone Operator: Liang Xu

Underwater Cinematographer: Harry Blyth

Colourist: Kaifu Deng

Special thanks to: Nanette Hassall, Emma Fishwick, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions, staff and rangers of Serpentine National Park

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