Title

Emotional Comfort: The Patient's Perspective of a Therapeutic Context

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Pergamon

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Postgraduate Medicine

RAS ID

4269

Comments

This article was originally published as: Williams, A. , & Irurita, V. (2006). Emotional comfort: the patient's perspective of a therapeutic context. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 43(4), 405-415. Original article available here

Abstract

Background - Comfort is a word that is frequently used to describe both physical and emotional aspects of the hospital experience. A number of definitions exist in the literature and there is a lack of clarity in understanding this concept. Objectives - This paper describes the therapeutic context of emotional comfort that was identified in a qualitative study that sought to explain the perceived therapeutic effect of interpersonal interactions that were experienced by patients during hospitalisation. Design - Grounded theory. Settings - Public and private hospitals situated in Perth, Western Australia. Participants - 40 patient participants from a variety of settings, and 32 nurse participants. All participants were over the age of 18 and spoke English. Methods - Formal and informal interviews, field observations. Results - Patients interpreted the interpersonal interactions that they experienced during hospitalisation in terms of their experience of emotional comfort or discomfort. A central feature of emotional comfort was the patient's perception of personal control. Conclusions - This study provides a greater understanding of the concept of comfort from the perspective of hospitalised patients. It highlights that patients approach their illnesses or injuries perceiving that a connection exists between the mind and the body.

DOI

10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2005.06.004

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2005.06.004