Title

Maximal strength and cortisol responses to psyching-up during the squat exercise

Document Type

Journal Article

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Science

RAS ID

2764

Comments

McGuigan, M. R., Ghiagiarelli, J., & Tod, D. (2005). Maximal strength and cortisol responses to psyching-up during the squat exercise. Journal of sports sciences, 23(7), 687-692. Available here

Abstract

We studied the effect of psyching-up on one-repetition maximum (1-RM) performance and salivary cortisol responses during the squat exercise. Ten men (age 21.6 ± 1.4 years; mean ± s) and ten women (age 22.4 ± 2.8 years) with weight training experience of 4.5 ± 2.0 years participated in this study. One-repetition maximum squats were performed on a Smith machine during each of two different intervention conditions that were counterbalanced and consisted of a free choice psych-up and a cognitive distraction. Saliva samples were obtained at the beginning of each test session and immediately after the final 1-RM attempt. No significant difference in 1-RM was identified between psyching-up (104 ± 50 kg) and cognitive distraction (106 ± 52 kg). Performing a 1-RM in the squat exercise significantly increased salivary cortisol concentrations during both conditions (P  < 0.05). There was no significant difference in salivary cortisol responses between conditions. These results suggest that psyching-up does not increase 1-RM performance during the squat exercise in strength-trained individuals.

DOI

10.1080/02640410400021401

Access Rights

free_to_read

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1080/02640410400021401