Title

Public Street Surveillance: A Psychometric Study on the Perceived Social Risk

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Engineering

RAS ID

107

Comments

Brooks, D., & Smith, C.L. (2002). Public Street Surveillance: A Psychometric Study on the Perceived Social Risk. In: Hutchinson, W. (Ed.). Protecting the infrastructure: 3rd Australian information warfare & security conference 2002. Churchlands, Australia: We-B Centre, School of Management Information Systems, School of Computer & Information Sciences, Edith Cowan University.

Abstract

This study quantitatively measured the social risk perception of public street surveillance, using spatial representation and multidimensional scaling (MDS). It utilized the psychometric paradigm, a method that presents risk perception in a two factor representation, being dread and familiarity to risk. The investigation showed the social risk perception of public street surveillance as low dread and familiar risk. MDS underlying dimensions presented public street surveillance as a low sense of risk perception and a low perceived community exposure to risk. This demonstrated a perceived social benefit, outweighing the perceived risk.

 
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