Title

Immigration adaptation: Understanding the process through sense of community

Document Type

Book Chapter

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Psychology

RAS ID

1238

Comments

Sonn C.C. (2002). Immigrant Adaptation. In: Fisher A.T., Sonn C.C., Bishop B.J. (eds) Psychological Sense of Community. The Plenum Series in Social/Clinical Psychology. Springer, Boston, MA

Abstract

Immigration and cross-cultural transition are strong features of modern societies. It has been suggested that immigration is one of the main processes that have contributed to the culturally pluralistic nature of many nations (Berry, 1998; Blauner, 1972). Immigration, voluntary or involuntary, is a transition that often entails the severing of community ties, the loss of social networks and familiar bonds — it can mean the loss of taken for granted sources and systems of meaning. Many have discussed the negative social and psychological challenges and outcomes associated with immigration and settlement in unfamiliar environments (e. g., Berry, 1984; Berry, 1986; Berrym, 1997; Birman, 1994; Furnham & Bochner, 1986; Ogbu, 1994; Segall, Dasen, Berry, & Poortinga, 1999).

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-0719-2_11

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1007/978-1-4615-0719-2_11