Title

Evaluation and cost-benefits of controlling house mice ( mus domestics) on islands: An example from Thevenard island, Western Australia

Authors

Dorian Moro

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Elsevier Science

Faculty

Faculty of Computing, Health and Science

School

School of Natural Sciences

RAS ID

809

Comments

Moro, D. (2001). Evaluation and cost-benefits of controlling house mice (Mus domesticus) on islands: an example from Thevenard Island, Western Australia. Biological Conservation, 99(3), 355-364.

Abstract

Feral mammals occur on many offshore islands around Australia, but their eradication by poison-baiting requires a careful assessment of the associated costs and long-term benefits. This paper describes a replicated trial program to poison house mice Mus domesticus selectively on Thevenard Island, Western Australia, in the presence of a native species of mouse, and to evaluate whether the eradication of house mice from the island is an achievable and cost-effective goal. It was found the densities and survivorship of house mice declined more on grids with bait stations spaced every 10 m than on grids baited every 20 m when compared to unbaited (control) grids. On one grid baited every 10 m, the abundance of house mice declined by 83% 22 days after baiting commenced. This decline was correlated with an increase in the abundance of short-tailed mice Leggadina lakedownensis on the grid. A total of 55 person days was required to conduct the present poison-baiting trials, and expenses incurred were over $AUS1000 ha−1. Baiting islands for house mice can prove a costly excercise, and management organisations need to assess whether ground-based baiting is an efficacious and cost-effective management option if complete eradication fails.

DOI

10.1016/S0006-3207(00)00231-7

 
COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

10.1016/S0006-3207(00)00231-7