Title

The mnemonic influence of self-cues on narrative recall

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Curtin University of Technology

Faculty

Faculty of Community Services, Education and Social Sciences

School

School of International, Cultural and Community Studies

RAS ID

1336

Comments

Sharifian, F. (2001). The mnemonic influence of self-cues on narrative recall. Issues in Educational Research, 11(1), 15-24.

Abstract

A major issue in educational design is the provision of techniques which enhance learners' memory processes. A mnemonic advantage has been observed in cognitive research for self-cues. Self-cues are one or a few words provided by the learner, rather than a third party, about a paragraph. This study explored the effect of self-cues on the recall of narrative texts in learners of English as a second language. Under two general conditions, participants either read and recalled two narrative texts or read them and provided self-cues before recall. The results indicated that: a) self-cues facilitated the quantity of the recall (i.e., number of paragraphs recalled), regardless of whether or not participants were allowed to inspect their cues during recall, b) self-cues had no significant effect on the completeness with which each paragraph was recalled, c) paragraphs recalled at an earlier stage of output were more complete than those recalled at a later stage.

Access Rights

free_to_read

 
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