Title

Non-modifiable factors as moderators of the relationship between physical activity and brain volume: A cross-sectional UK biobank study

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

Volume

88

Issue

3

First Page

1091

Last Page

1101

PubMed ID

35754269

Publisher

IOS

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

44431

Comments

Brown, B. M., de Frutos Lucas, J., Porter, T., Frost, N., Vacher, M., Peiffer, J. J., & Laws, S. M. (2022). Non-modifiable factors as moderators of the relationship between physical activity and brain volume: A cross-sectional UK Biobank study, 88(3), 1091-1101. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-220114

Abstract

Background

Previous research suggests physical activity attenuates grey and white matter loss; however, there appears to be individual variability in this effect. Understanding factors that can influence the relationship between physical activity and brain volume may enable prediction of individual response.

Objective

The current study examined the relationship between objectively-measured physical activity and brain volume; and whether this relationship is moderated by age, sex, or a priori candidate genetic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met, or apolipoprotein (APOE) ϵ4 allele carriage. Methods: Data from 10,083 men and women (50 years and over) of the UK Biobank were used to examine the study objectives. All participants underwent a magnetic resonance imaging scan to quantify grey and white matter volumes, physical activity monitoring via actigraphy, and genotyping.

Results

Physical activity was associated with total grey matter volume, total white matter volume, and right hippocampal volume. Only males had an association between higher physical activity levels and greater cortical grey matter volume, total grey matter volume, and right hippocampal volume. Age moderated the relationship between physical activity and white matter volume.

Conclusion

Our results indicate that in males, but not females, an association exists between objectively-measured physical activity and grey matter volume. Age may also play a role in impacting the relationship between physical activity and brain volume. Future research should evaluate longitudinal brain volumetrics to better understand the nature of age and sex-effects on the physical activity and brain volume relationship.

DOI

10.3233/JAD-220114

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