Title

Effects of far-infrared radiation-lamp therapy on recovery from simulated soccer match running activities in elite soccer players

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

International journal of sports physiology and performance

Volume

17

Issue

9

First Page

1432

Last Page

1438

PubMed ID

35894955

Publisher

Human Kinetics

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Human Performance

RAS ID

51963

Comments

Hsieh, C. C., Nosaka, K., Chou, T. Y., Hsu, S. T., & Chen, T. C. (2022). Effects of far-infrared radiation-lamp therapy on recovery from simulated soccer match running activities in elite soccer players. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 17(9), 1432-1438. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijspp.2022-0084

Abstract

Purpose: The authors investigated whether far-infrared radiation (FIR) lamp therapy would reduce muscle damage and enhance recovery from multiple soccer-match-related running activities. Methods: Twenty-four elite female soccer players (20-24 y) were assigned into a FIR or a sham treatment group (n = 12/group). They performed a daily 90-minute Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) for 6 consecutive days. Maximal voluntary contraction torque of the knee extensors (KEs) and flexors, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase activity, countermovement jump, and several other performance measures (eg, 30-m dash, Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1) were taken before the first LIST, 1 hour after each LIST, and 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after the last LIST. All participants received a 30-minute FIR or sham treatment on KEs and knee flexors, respectively, at 2 hour after each LIST and 25, 49, 73, and 97 hours after the last LIST. Results: All measures changed significantly (P < .05) at 1 hour after the first LIST without difference (P > .05) between groups. Maximal voluntary contraction torque (eg, the largest decrease of KE for FIR: 13 % [4 %], sham: 25 % [5 %]), countermovement jump height (4 % [3 %] vs 14 % [4 %]), and other performance measures (eg, Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test: 11 % [5 %] vs 26 % [5 %]) decreased less, and peak muscle soreness (eg, KE: 26 [9] vs 51 [18] mm) and plasma creatine kinase activity (172 [32] vs 1289 [610] IU/L) were smaller for the FIR than for the sham group (P < .05), and they returned to the baseline earlier (P < .05) for the FIR group. Conclusions: These results suggest that the FIR therapy provided potent effects on reducing accumulated muscle damage and enhancing recovery.

DOI

10.1123/ijspp.2022-0084

Access Rights

subscription content

Share

 
COinS