Title

A new portable device to reliably measure maximal strength and rate of force development of hip adduction and abduction

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Volume

36

Issue

9

First Page

2465

Last Page

2471

PubMed ID

35696597

Publisher

National Strength and Conditioning Association

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

RAS ID

51759

Comments

Gonçalves, B. A., Mesquita, R. N., Tavares, F., Brito, J., Correia, P., Santos, P., & Mil-Homens, P. (2022). A new portable device to reliably measure maximal strength and rate of force development of hip adduction and abduction. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 36(9), 2465-2471. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003872

Abstract

Groin injuries are a major issue in sports involving kicking or quick changes of direction. Decreased hip adduction and abduction strength have been indicated as one of the main risk factors for groin injury. The methods currently available to measure hip adduction and abduction strength are reliable but highly dependent on the evaluator skills. Furthermore, several studies have reported the reliability of maximal strength (MVIC), but very few studies investigated the reliability of explosive strength (RFD), a parameter that has been previously shown to have a higher functional value. The aim of the current investigation was to assess the reliability of a user-independent portable dynamometer that concurrently measures MVIC and RFD. Twenty-five healthy young subjects performed maximal isometric hip adduction and abduction in both sitting and supine positions. Measurements occurred in 2 different days separated by 48-72 hours. Test-retest reliability was calculated for both MVIC and RFD. Both MVIC and RFD showed good relative reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.77-0.98) with no differences between positions or muscle actions. Measurement error was similar between positions for MVIC in both hip adduction and abduction. Measurements of RFD showed higher reliability using a time window of at least 0-100 milliseconds, and lower measurement error was observed in sitting for adduction and in supine for abduction. This study shows that portable dynamometry can be used to concurrently measure hip adduction and abduction maximal and explosive strength, with levels of reliability that are similar to previously described methods.

DOI

10.1519/JSC.0000000000003872

Access Rights

subscription content

Share

 
COinS