Title

Assessment of the causal effect of IgG N-glycosylation level on risk of dementia: A 2-sample Mendelian randomization study

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD

Volume

88

Issue

4

First Page

1435

Last Page

1441

PubMed ID

35811520

Publisher

IOS Press

School

Centre for Precision Health / School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

51814

Funders

National Natural Science Foundation of China (81872682) / Beijing Postdoctoral Research Foundation / Application and Evaluation of Active Health Cloud Platform in China / National Key R&D Program of China (2018YFC2000704)

Comments

Zhang, X., Cong, R., Geng, T., Zhang, J., Liu, D., Tian, Q., ... & Wang, Y. (2022). Assessment of the causal effect of IgG N-glycosylation level on risk of dementia: A 2-sample Mendelian randomization study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 88(4), 1435-1441. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-220074

Abstract

Background: Previous prospective studies highlighted aberrant immunoglobulin G (IgG) N-glycosylation as a risk factor for dementia [such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD)]. It is unclear whether this association is causal or explained by confounding or reverse causation. Objective: The aim is to examine the association of genetically predicted IgG N-glycosylation with dementia using 2-sample Mendelian randomization (MR). Methods: Independent genetic variants for IgG N-glycosylation traits were selected as instrument variables from published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry. We extracted their corresponding summary statistics from large-scale clinically diagnosed AD GWAS dataset and FinnGen biobank VaD GWAS dataset. The inverse variance weighted (IVW) was performed to calculate the effect estimates. Meanwhile, multiple sensitivity analyses were used to assess horizontal pleiotropy and outliers. Results: There were no associations of genetically predicted IgG N-glycosylation traits with the risk of AD and VaD using the IVW method (all Bonferroni corrected p  >  0.0013). These estimates of four additional sensitivity analyses methods were consistent with the IVW estimates in terms of direction and magnitude. Additionally, the MR-PRESSO global test and the intercept of MR-Egger regression indicated no evidence of horizontal pleiotropy. Meanwhile, the heterogeneity test showed no significant heterogeneity using the Cochran Q statistic. The leave-one-out sensitivity analyses also did not detect any significant change. Conclusion: Our MR study did not support evidence for the hypothesis that IgG N-glycosylation level may be causally associated with the risk of dementia.

DOI

10.3233/JAD-220074

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