Title

Dietary vitamin K1 intake is associated with lower long-term fracture-related hospitalization risk: The Perth longitudinal study of ageing women

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Food & Function

Publisher

Royal Society of Chemistry

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Nutrition and Health Innovation Research Institute

RAS ID

47198

Comments

Sim, M., Strydom, A., Blekkenhorst, L. C., Bondonno, N. P., McCormick, R., Lim, W. H., ... & Prince, R. L. (2022). Dietary vitamin K1 intake is associated with lower long-term fracture-related hospitalization risk: The Perth longitudinal study of ageing women. Food & function, 13(20), 10642-10650. https://doi.org/10.1039/D2FO02494B

Abstract

This study examined the association between dietary Vitamin K1 intake with fracture-related hospitalizations over 14.5 years in community-dwelling older Australian women (n = 1373, ≥ 70 years). Dietary Vitamin K1 intake at baseline (1998) was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire and a new Australian Vitamin K nutrient database, which was supplemented with published data. Over 14.5 years, any fracture (n = 404, 28.3 %) and hip fracture (n = 153, 10.7 %) related hospitalizations were captured using linked health data. Plasma Vitamin D status (25OHD) and the ratio of undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) to total osteocalcin (tOC) from serum was assessed at baseline. Estimates of dietary Vitamin K1 intake were supported by a significant inverse association with ucOC : tOC; a marker of Vitamin K status (r = − 0.12, p < 0.001). Compared to women with the lowest Vitamin K1 intake (Quartile 1, < 61 μg d − 1), women with the highest Vitamin K1 intake (Quartile 4, ≥ 99 μg d − 1) had lower hazards for any fracture- (HR 0.69 95 % CI 0.52 – 0.91, p < 0.001) and hip fracture-related hospitalization (HR 0.51 95 % CI 0.32 – 0.79, p < 0.001), independent of 25OHD levels, as part of multivariable-adjusted analysis. Spline analysis suggested a nadir in the relative hazard for any fracture-related hospitalizations at a Vitamin K1 intake of approximately 100 μg day − 1. For hip fractures, a similar relationship was apparent. Higher dietary Vitamin K1 is associated with lower long-term risk for any fracture- and hip fracture-related hospitalizations in community-dwelling older women.

DOI

10.1039/D2FO02494B

Access Rights

subscription content

Share

 
COinS