Title

Ileocolic anastomosis after right hemicolectomy: Stapled end-to-side, stapled side-to-side, or handsewn?

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

International Journal of Colorectal Disease

PubMed ID

35124716

Publisher

Springer

School

School of Science

RAS ID

43306

Comments

Rajan, R., Arachchi, A., Metlapalli, M., Lo, J., Ratinam, R., Nguyen, T. C., . . . Chouhan, H. (2022). Ileocolic anastomosis after right hemicolectomy: Stapled end-to-side, stapled side-to-side, or handsewn?. International Journal of Colorectal Disease, 37(3), 673-681.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s00384-022-04102-0

Abstract

Purpose:

Anastomotic leak (AL) following ileocolic anastomosis is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Stapled end-to-side (ESA), stapled side-to-side (SSA), and handsewn anastomoses (HSA) are commonly performed techniques. There is however conflicting data on the superiority of one technique over the other. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of ESA against SSA and HSA.

Methods:

This retrospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary colorectal unit. All patients who underwent an ileocolic anastomosis from October 2008 to May 2020 were included. Exclusion criteria were missing data on anastomotic technique or clinicopathological variables. Primary outcomes were AL and anastomotic bleeding (AB). Secondary outcomes were length of stay (LoS) and return of gut function.

Results:

A total of 1390 patients met the inclusion criteria. A total of 976 (70%) ESA, 308 (22%) SSA, and 108 (8%) HSA were performed. AL occurred in 17/1390 (1.2%) patients, and 54/1390 (3.9%) had AB. On adjusted analysis, ESA experienced a lower AL when compared with SSA (OR 4.93, p = 0.005), with a trend towards a lower AL when compared to HSA (OR 2.6, p = 0.27). There was no difference in AB between all techniques: ESA vs. SSA (OR 1.07 p = 0.84), and ESA vs. HSA (OR 0.24 p = 0.76). Both stapled techniques were associated with a shorter return to gut function compared to HSA; 3.3 vs. 4.2 days (p < 0.001). There was no difference in LoS.

Conclusion:

ESA has the lowest leak rate when compared to other anastomotic techniques without any increased risk of anastomotic bleeding.

DOI

10.1007/s00384-022-04102-0

Access Rights

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Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Prevention, detection and management of cancer and other chronic diseases

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