Title

Healthy lifestyle initiatives for increasing fruit and vegetable intake among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism

Volume

47

Issue

2

First Page

115

Last Page

123

PubMed ID

34797739

Publisher

Canadian Science Publishing

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

40348

Funders

National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Emerging Leadership Investigator Grant (ID: 1172987) / National Heart Foundation of Australia Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship (ID: 102498)

Grant Number

NHMRC Number : 1172987

Comments

Blekkenhorst, L. C., Ride, K. M., Wallace, R. M., Eades, S. J., McAullay, D., & Godrich, S. L. (2022). Healthy lifestyle initiatives for increasing fruit and vegetable intake among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 47(2), 115-123.

https://doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2021-0076

Abstract

Adequate fruit and vegetable intake is key to reducing chronic disease risk among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. This rapid review collated evidence on healthy lifestyle initiatives that focused on increasing fruit and vegetable intake among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples residing in major cities. Due to limited studies conducted within major cities, we extended our inclusion criteria to regional and remote areas. Sixteen studies were included. Five (31%) studies were rated as good quality (least risk of bias), 10 (63%) studies were rated as fair, and 1 (6%) study was rated as poor (significant risk of bias). Five (31%) studies employed participatory research in the design and/or execution, and 7 (44%) studies included minimal community involvement. Only 5 (31%) studies were undertaken in major cities; 4 of these combined major cities with regional and/or remote areas. All 5 studies reported positive findings, such as an increase in fresh fruit availability, usage of fresh vegetables, or self-reported fruit and vegetable intake. This review provides evidence confirming the need for high-quality healthy lifestyle initiatives to increase fruit and vegetable intake targeted at Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living in major cities. This evidence will assist community organisations in designing effective health promotion interventions, providing insight into improving the structure and function of such programs. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42020194522. Novelty Five studies were undertaken in major cities and all reported positive findings; only 1 study was rated as good quality. Presented data supports the need for high-quality studies to be conducted among those residing in major cities.

DOI

10.1139/apnm-2021-0076

Access Rights

free_to_read

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