Title

Comparison of the potentiating effect of variable load jump squats on acute drop jump performance in rugby sevens athletes

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Publisher

Wolters Kluwer / National Strength and Conditioning Association

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research / Exercise Medicine Research Institute

RAS ID

42778

Comments

Poulos, N., Haff, G. G., Nibali, M., Graham-Smith, P., & Newton, R. U. (2022). Comparison of the potentiating effect of variable load jump squats on acute drop jump performance in rugby sevens athletes. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000004214

Abstract

Poulos, N, Haff, GG, Nibali, M, Graham-Smith, P, and Newton, RU. Comparison of the potentiating effect of variable load jump squats on acute drop jump performance in rugby sevens athletes. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000–000, 2021—The effect of variable load jump squats (JSs) on acute drop jump (DJ) performance across multiple sets was examined. Seventeen elite rugby sevens athletes performed 3 DJs after 3 repetitions of a JS conditioning activity (CA) performed at 30 or 50% 1RM back squat loads. Acute postactivation performance enhancement (PAPE) in DJ kinetic and kinematic variables was assessed using a commercially available force platform (1,000 Hz). Postactivation performance enhancement was predominant after the 30% 1RM load with the greatest frequency of potentiation exhibited in set 3. The 50% 1RM CA resulted in substantial decrements in DJ performance with the exception of active stiffness, reactive strength index (flight:contact time), and contact time. Moderate differences were observed between the 50 and 30% 1RM loads for peak power (W), impulse (N·s−1), and force at zero velocity (N); active stiffness was the only variable where PAPE was greater in the 50% 1RM CA (ES: small). Active stiffness was the only variable to display favorable associations with relative strength in both the JS 30% 1RM (ES: 0.38 ± 0.20; moderate) and 50% 1RM (ES: 0.24 ± 0.23; small) CA loads. The JS 30% 1RM CA results in greater magnitude and frequency of PAPE of DJ kinetic and kinematic variables and is recommended if seeking to target PAPE in a range of DJ performance variables. Heavier JS loads may be appropriate if enhancement of muscle stiffness and stretch-shortening cycle efficiency is required. Consideration of targeted kinetic and kinematic variables when selecting CA intensity in complex training design is recommended.

DOI

10.1519/JSC.0000000000004214

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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