Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

PLoS ONE

Volume

17

Issue

2 February

PubMed ID

35213652

Publisher

PLOS

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

RAS ID

43777

Funders

SPS KAKENHI (Grant Number JP19K24299)

Comments

Nishida, S., Nakamura, M., Kiyono, R., Sato, S., Yasaka, K., Yoshida, R., & Nosaka, K. (2022). Relationship between Nordic hamstring strength and maximal voluntary eccentric, concentric and isometric knee flexion torque. Plos one, 17 (2), e0264465. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0264465

Abstract

Nordic hamstring exercise is performed to prevent knee flexor muscle strain injuries and used to assess their injury risks. However, what exactly Nordic hamstring strength indicates is not clear. We investigated the relationship between Nordic hamstring strength and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque of the knee flexors measured by an isokinetic dynamometer. Sixteen healthy young men who had not experienced hamstring strain injuries participated in the study. In Nordic hamstring, each participant was instructed to lean forward as far as possible in 3 s (approximately 30/s), and force at the ankle joint of the dominant leg was measured during the movement. The force was multiplied by lower leg length and converted into torque. MVC torque of the knee flexors was measured isometrically at 30, 45, 60, and 90 knee flexion joint angles, and concentrically and eccentrically at 30/s and 60/s in 10–90 knee flexion for the dominant leg in a prone position. Correlations among the dependent variables were assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Peak Nordic hamstring torque ranged 96.8–163.5 Nm, and peak MVC eccentric torque ranged 50.7–109.4 Nm at 30/s and 59.2–121.2 Nm at 60/s. No significant correlations were evident between the peak Nordic hamstring torque and peak eccentric knee flexion torque (r = 0.24–0.3, p = 0.26–0.4). This was also the case for the Nordic hamstring torque and MVC torque of isometric (r = −0.03–0.1, p = 0.71–0.92) and concentric contractions (r = 0.28–0.49, p = 0.053–0.29). These results show that Nordic hamstring strength is not associated with the knee flexor torque measured by an isokinetic dynamometer. It may be that other factors than static and dynamic hamstring strengths affect Nordic hamstring strength.

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0264465

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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