Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

School

School of Engineering

RAS ID

45168

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in CRITICAL REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION on 06/05/2022, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10408398.2022.2070721.

Jafarzadeh, S., Forough, M., Amjadi, S., Javan Kouzegaran, V., Almasi, H., Garavand, F., & Zargar, M. (2022). Plant protein-based nanocomposite films: A review on the used nanomaterials, characteristics, and food packaging applications. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2022.2070721

Abstract

Consumer demands to utilize environmentally friendly packaging have led researchers to develop packaging materials from naturally derived resources. In recent years, plant protein-based films as a replacement for synthetic plastics have attracted the attention of the global food packaging industry due to their biodegradability and unique properties. Biopolymer-based films need a filler to show improved packaging properties. One of the latest strategies introduced to food packaging technology is the production of nanocomposite films which are multiphase materials containing a filler with at least one dimension less than 100 nm. This review provides the recent findings on plant-based protein films as biodegradable materials that can be combined with nanoparticles that are applicable to food packaging. Moreover, it investigates the characterization of nanocomposite plant-based protein films/edible coatings. It also briefly describes the application of plant-based protein nanocomposite films/coating on fruits/vegetables, meat and seafood products, and some other foods. The results indicate that the functional performance, barrier, mechanical, optical, thermal and antimicrobial properties of plant protein-based materials can be extended by incorporating nanomaterials. Recent reports provide a better understanding of how incorporating nanomaterials into plant protein-based biopolymers leads to an increase in the shelf life of food products during storage time.

DOI

10.1080/10408398.2022.2070721

Available for download on Saturday, May 06, 2023

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