Title

Effects of vest and sled resisted sprint training on sprint performance in young soccer players: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of strength and conditioning research

Volume

36

Issue

7

First Page

2023

Last Page

2034

PubMed ID

35510888

Publisher

National Strength and Conditioning Association

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

45190

Comments

Fernández-Galván, L. M., Casado, A., García-Ramos, A., & Haff, G. G. (2022). Effects of Vest and Sled Resisted Sprint Training on Sprint Performance in Young Soccer Players: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 36(7), p. 2023-2034. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000004255

Abstract

The aim of the meta-analysis was to determine the effect of resisted sprint training (RST) on sprint performance in young ( < 20 years) soccer players and to analyze whether the training equipment (sled or vest) and magnitude of the resistive load (above or below 20 % of body mass [BM]) influences the long-term adaptations in sprint performance. Resisted sprint training reduced the acceleration phase time [standardized mean difference (SMD) = -0.41], with greater reduction in sprint time occurring in response to applying resistance with a vest (SMD = -0.70) when compared with a sled (SMD = -0.27). Similar reductions were determined for resistive loads < 20% (SMD = -0.55) and ≥ 20% of BM (SMD = -0.31). Full sprint time showed a small reduction after RST (SMD = -0.36), regardless of the training equipment (sled: SMD = -0.44; vest: SMD = -0.26) and resistive load ( < 20% of BM: SMD = -0.40 ≥ 20% of BM: SMD = -0.21). There was a small and nonsignificant reduction in the maximum-velocity phase after RST (SMD = -0.25), which was comparable when the training was performed with vest (SMD = -0.34) or sled (SMD = -0.22). No significant differences in the changes of the acceleration phase time (SMD = 0.05) or full sprint time (SMD = 0.08) were observed between the experimental (sled or vest RST) and control groups (only soccer or unresisted sprint training). In conclusion, RST is effective to improve sprint performance in young soccer players, but the improvements are not superior to unresisted sprint training.

DOI

10.1519/JSC.0000000000004255

Access Rights

free_to_read

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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