Title

Psychosocial adaptation and mental health of young people living in the context of a COVID-19 pandemic in Quebec, Canada. Descriptive and preliminary data

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Canadian Psychology/Psychologie canadienne

Publisher

Canadian Psychological Association

School

School of Education

RAS ID

35531

Comments

Baudry, C., Pearson, J., Massé, L., Ouellet, G., Bégin, J. Y., Couture, C., ... & Burton, K. (2021). Adaptation psychosociale et santé mentale des jeunes vivant en contexte de pandémie lié à la CODIV-19 au Québec, Canada. Données descriptives et préliminaires. [Psychosocial adaptation and mental health of young people living in the context of a COVID-19 pandemic in Quebec, Canada. Descriptive and preliminary data]. Canadian Psychology/Psychologie canadienne, 62(1), 80-91.

https://doi.org/10.1037/cap0000271

Please note: This item is in the French language.

Abstract

On March 11, 2020, COVID-19 was declared a pandemic. Soon after, the first studies began documenting the impacts of the pandemic on children’s adaptation in Europe and Asia. In Quebec, Canada, few published studies, to date, report on the adaptation of children living in the context of a pandemic. This studies’ objectives are to: (a) describe the level of exposure to the pandemic; (b) present a portrait of the psychosocial adaptation and the mental health of children aged 6 to 17; (c) assess whether the experience of the pandemic influences their adaptation; and (d) evaluate whether children with mental health vulnerabilities are doing worse than those without such vulnerabilities in this particular life context. Statistical analyses reveal that the majority of children do not present difficulties in terms of overall adaptation in the context of the pandemic (65.8%). During confinement, boys present more attentional difficulties and aggressive behaviors than girls. Furthermore, the advancing age of children is positively associated with the presence of withdrawal/depression symptoms. Children who are more knowledgeable about the pandemic have more internalized behaviors. Finally, children who had mental health vulnerabilities prior to the pandemic present more difficulties in overall coping during the pandemic than other youth. Although the results are consistent with other studies and reveal that youth can cope adequately, the fact remains that some children are experiencing difficulties that need to be addressed.

DOI

10.1037/cap0000271

Access Rights

free_to_read

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Diverse, equitable, informed and productive communities, schools and workplaces

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Article Location

 
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