Title

Clinical Placement Before or After Simulated Learning Environments?: A Naturalistic Study of Clinical Skills Acquisition Among Early-Stage Paramedicine Students

Document Type

Journal Article

Publisher

Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

School

Collaborative Research Network (CRN) Project

RAS ID

19787

Comments

Mills, B. W., Carter, O. B., Rudd, C. J., Ross, N. P., & Claxton, L. A. (2015). Clinical placement before or after simulated learning environments?: a naturalistic study of clinical skills acquisition among early-stage paramedicine students. Simulation in Healthcare, 10(5), 263-269. Available here

Abstract

Background: There is conflicting evidence surrounding the merit of clinical placements (CPs) for early-stage health-profession students. Some contend that early-stage CPs facilitate contextualization of a subsequently learned theory. Others argue that training in simulated-learning experiences (SLEs) should occur before CP to ensure that students possess at least basic competency. We sought to investigate both claims. Methods: First-year paramedicine students (n = 85) undertook 3 days of CP and SLEs as part of course requirements. Students undertook CP either before or after participation in SLEs creating 2 groups (Clin→Sim/Sim→Clin). Clinical skills acquisition was measured via direct scenario-based clinical assessments with expert observers conducted at 4 intervals during the semester. Perceptions of difficulty of CP and SLE were measured via the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index. Results: Students' clinical assessment scores in both groups improved significantly from beginning to end of semester (P< 0.001). However, at semester's end, clinical assessment scores for the Sim→Clin group were statistically significantly greater than those of the Clin→Sim group (P = 0.021). Both groups found SLEs more demanding than CP (P

DOI

10.1097/SIH.0000000000000107

Access Rights

free_to_read

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