Title

The implementation of an infection control bundle within a total care burns unit

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Burns

Volume

47

Issue

3

First Page

569

Last Page

575

PubMed ID

33858714

Publisher

Elsevier

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

RAS ID

35991

Comments

Mcwilliams, T. L., Twigg, D., Hendricks, J., Wood, F. M., Ryan, J., & Keil, A. (2021). The implementation of an infection control bundle within a total care burns unit. Burns, 47(3), 569-575. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2019.12.012

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the impact of the implementation of a best practice infection prevention and control bundle on healthcare associated burn wound infections in a paediatric burns unit. Background: Burn patients are vulnerable to infection. For this patient population, infection is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, thereby representing a significant challenge for burns clinicians who care for them. Methods: An interrupted time series was used to compare healthcare associated burn wound infections in paediatric burn patients before and after implementation of an infection prevention and control bundle. Prospective surveillance of healthcare associated burn wound infections was conducted from 2012 to 2014. Other potential healthcare associated infection rates were also reviewed over the study period, including urinary tract infections, pneumonia, upper respiratory tract infections and sepsis. An infection prevention and control bundle developed in collaboration between the paediatric burn unit and infection control clinicians was implemented in 2013 in addition to previous standard practice. Results: During the study period a total of 626 patients were admitted to the paediatric burns unit. Healthcare associated burn wound infections reduced from 34 in 2012 to 0 in 2014 following the implementation of the infection prevention and control bundle. Pneumonia and sepsis also reduced to 0 in 2013 and 2014, however one upper respiratory tract infection occurred in 2013 and urinary tract infections persisted in 2013. Conclusion: The implementation of an infection prevention and control bundle was effective in reducing healthcare associated burn wound infections, pneumonia and sepsis within our paediatric burns unit. Urinary tract infections remain a challenge for future improvement.

DOI

10.1016/j.burns.2019.12.012

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Safety and quality in health care

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