Title

Ankle proprioception, range of motion and drop landing ability differentiates competitive and non-competitive surfers

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

Volume

24

Issue

6

First Page

609

Last Page

613

PubMed ID

33414023

Publisher

Elsevier

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences

RAS ID

36326

Funders

Australian Institute of Sport Edith Cowan University

Comments

Dowse, R. A., Secomb, J. L., Bruton, M., & Nimphius, S. (2021). Ankle proprioception, range of motion and drop landing ability differentiates competitive and non-competitive surfers. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 24(6), 609-613. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2020.12.011

Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether ankle proprioception differs by competitive level and is related to years of surf-specific experience. A secondary objective of this study is to further compare the physical capacities and abilities that may differentiate between the competitive levels of surfing. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Twelve junior-elite (currently competing at a state level or higher and 12–18 years of age), twelve senior-elite (currently competing at a national level and/or the World Qualifying Series and over 16 years of age), and twelve recreational surfers (minimum of two years surfing experience; actively surfing at least once a week and over 18 years of age) were recruited for this study. All participants completed a pre-exercise medical questionnaire, anthropometric assessment, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion assessment, medial-lateral ankle proprioception assessment, countermovement jump, squat jump, isometric mid-thigh pull and drop-and-stick. Results: Senior-elite surfers had large and significantly better ankle proprioception and range of motion than junior-elite and recreational surfers. However, the relationship between years of surf-specific experience and ankle proprioception was small and non-significant. Better drop-and-stick performance, indicated by lower relative peak force, was present in the senior-elite compared to the junior-elite and recreational groups. Conclusions: The results indicate that medial-lateral ankle proprioception is a distinguishing characteristic of senior-elite surfers and therefore, may be a critical ability for competitive success. Greater ankle range of motion and the ability to attenuate energy to reduce landing force may be developed through long-term training commensurate with competitive surfing.

DOI

10.1016/j.jsams.2020.12.011

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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