Title

Effects of whole-body vibration training on calf muscle function during maximal isometric voluntary contractions

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports

Volume

31

Issue

6

First Page

1268

Last Page

1275

Publisher

Wiley

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

RAS ID

35520

Comments

Rubio‐Arias, J. Á., Ramos‐Campo, D. J., Alcaraz, P. E., Jiménez Díaz, J. F., & Blazevich, A. J. (2021). Effects of whole‐body vibration training on calf muscle function during maximal isometric voluntary contractions. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 31(6), 1268-1275. https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13935

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to determine the impact of 6 weeks of whole-body vibration training (WBVT) on maximum voluntary plantar flexor strength, muscle activity via surface electromyography (EMG), and muscle architecture measured at rest and during maximal contraction at different ankle joint angles in young healthy adults. Using a single-blind study design, 28 healthy men and women were randomly assigned to control (CG; N = 14, 7 women) or whole-body vibration training (WBVG; N = 14, 7 women) groups. Vibration training (20-25 minutes; standing with knees flexed) was performed 3 week−1 for 6 weeks (18 sessions). Maximum isometric plantar flexor torque, muscle activity (medial and lateral gastrocnemius EMG) and medial gastrocnemius fascicle angle and length at rest and maximum contraction were tested at four ankle joint angles (ranging 45° to −15°; 0° = anatomical) before and after training. Significant increases (24.7%-37.5%) were observed in peak torque (N∙m∙kg−1;%) at −15°, 0°, 15° and 30° joint angles from pre- to post-intervention in WBVG, which were different to CG (no change) and greater at longer muscle lengths. No between-group differences were observed in changes in EMG amplitudes measured during contraction or muscle architecture parameters at rest or during contraction. Six weeks of WBVT in young, healthy adults increased isometric plantarflexion strength at multiple joint angles, without detectible changes in EMG, muscle architecture, or body composition. Therefore, WBVT can significantly improve maximum plantar flexor strength at multiple joint angles (muscle lengths) in young healthy men, although the mechanisms underpinning the changes are currently unclear.

DOI

10.1111/sms.13935

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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