Title

Effects of wrist position on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the elbow flexors

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports

Volume

31

Issue

6

First Page

1290

Last Page

1300

Publisher

Wiley

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

RAS ID

36894

Comments

Lau, W. Y., Blazevich, A. J., Newton, M. J., Wu, S. S. X., & Nosaka, K. (2021). Effects of wrist position on eccentric exercise‐induced muscle damage of the elbow flexors. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 31(6), 1290-1300. https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.13936

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that the magnitude of changes in indirect muscle damage markers would be greater after maximal elbow flexor eccentric exercise in the supinated (shorter biceps brachii) than neutral wrist (longer) position, and the difference in the magnitude would be associated with greater elongation over contractions for the supinated than neutral position, rather than the initial muscle length. Ten untrained men (21-39 years) performed two bouts of 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors in the supinated position for one arm and neutral position for the other arm separated by 2 weeks in a randomized order. Biceps brachii myotendinous junction (MTJ) movements during eccentric contractions were recorded by B-mode ultrasonography, and the displacement from the start to end of each contraction was quantified. Peak torque (supinated: 367.8 ± 112.5 Nm, neutral: 381.5 ± 120.4 Nm) and total work (1816 ± 539 J, 1865 ± 673 J) produced during eccentric contractions were similar between conditions. The average MTJ displacement increased (P < .05) from the 1st set (8.0 ± 2.0 mm) to 10th set (15.8 ± 1.9 mm) for the supinated condition, but no such increase was found in the neutral condition (1st set: 5.1 ± 1.0 mm, 10th set: 5.0 ± 0.8 mm). Changes in indirect muscle damage markers (maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, serum creatine kinase activity, and muscle soreness) after exercise were greater (P < .05) for the supinated than neutral condition. These results suggest that the greater muscle damage marker changes for the supinated than neutral wrist position was associated with the greater muscle lengthening (strain).

DOI

10.1111/sms.13936

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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