Title

Training load, heart rate variability, direct current potential and elite long jump performance prior and during the 2016 Olympic Games

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Sports Science & Medicine

Publisher

Journal of Sports Science & Medicine

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Exercise Medicine Research Institute / Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention (ACRISP)

RAS ID

36262

Funders

International Olympic Committee

Comments

Coyne, J., Coutts, A., Newton, R., & Haff, G. G. (2021). Training load, heart rate variability, direct current potential and elite long jump performance prior and during the 2016 olympic games. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 20, 482-491. https://doi.org/10.52082/jssm.2021.482

Abstract

The primary objective of this investigation was to investigate the relationships between training load (TL), heart rate variability (HRV) and direct current potential (DC) with elite long jump performance prior to and during the 2016 Olympics Games. Sessional ratings of perceived exertion (sRPE), training duration, HRV and DC were collected from four elite athletes (26.4 ± 1.4 years, height 1.83 ± 0.05 m, weight 68.9 ± 5.0 kg) for a 16-week period in qualification for and competition at the 2016 Olympic Games. Acute and chronic TL, training stress balance and differential load were calculated with three different smoothing methods. These TL measures along with HRV and DC were examined for their relationship to intra-athlete performance using repeated measure correlations and linear mixed models. Successful compared to unsuccessful intra-athlete performances were characterised by a higher chronic TL (p < 0.01, f2 = 0.31) but only when TL was exponentially smoothed. There were also negative correlations between HRV and performance (r = -0.55, p < 0.01) and HRV was significantly lower for more successful performances (p < 0.01, f2 = 0.19). Exponentially smoothed chronic TL was significantly higher and HRV was significantly lower for successful intra-athlete performances prior and during the 2016 Olympics Games in an elite group of long jump athletes. Monitoring sRPE and HRV measures and manipulating TL prior to competition seems worthwhile for elite long jump athletes.

DOI

10.52082/jssm.2021.482

Access Rights

free_to_read

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

Share

 
COinS