Title

Countermovement jump and drop jump performances are related to grand jete´ leap performance in dancers with different skill levels

Author Identifier

Sophia Nimphius

ORCID : 0000-0002-3524-0245

Guy Gregory Haff

ORCID : 0000-0002-0676-7750

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

Publisher

National Strength and Conditioning Association

School

School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

RAS ID

29959

Comments

Blanco, P., Nimphius, S., Seitz, L. B., Spiteri, T., & Haff, G. G. (2021). Countermovement jump and drop jump performances are related to grand jete´ leap performance in dancers with different skill levels. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 35(12), 3386-3393. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003315

Abstract

Blanco, P, Nimphius, S, Seitz, LB, Spiteri, T, and Haff, GG. Countermovement jump and drop jump performances are related to grand jeté leap performance in dancers with different skill levels. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000–000, 2019—Thirty-five classical ballet dancers were chosen to investigate relationships between the grand jeté leap, countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ) and establish whether the magnitude of the relationship between these tests differed across 3 skill levels. Subjects (male: n = 11 and female: n = 24) were divided into 3 groups: novice (n = 12; age: 16.6 ± 1.5 years; height: 1.7 ± 0.1 m; body mass: 58.0 ± 13.0 kg), semiprofessional (n = 13; age: 20.0 ± 1.6 years; height: 1.7 ± 0.1 m; body mass: 64.1 ± 10.5 kg), and professional (n = 10; age: 23.8 ± 3.5 years; height: 1.8 ± 1.2 m; body mass: 63.3 ± 14.7 kg). Grand jeté leap height, followed by CMJ and DJ vertical displacement, was assessed. Significant relationships were found between the grand jeté, CMJ (r = 0.77, p = 0.001) and DJ (r = 0.76, p = 0.001). After a Fisher's r-z transformation, professional dancers and novice dancers showed greater r-value differences in CMJ (r2 − r1 = 0.27) compared with novice (r2 − r1 = 0.17) and semiprofessional dancers (r2 − r1 = 0.11), indicating larger strength of CMJ to grand jeté relationship in professionals. The grand jeté leap showed large to very large correlations with CMJ and DJ within groups. These common performance tests were determined to be practical and efficient methods for assessing the jumping ability of dancers. As dance skill increased, larger correlations were observed, suggesting that dancers with superior ballet skills may be more likely to use their underpinning physical capacities to jump higher within the context of ballet-specific jumping.

DOI

10.1519/JSC.0000000000003315

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Society and Culture

Priority Areas

Human movement and performance

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