Title

Needle-related pain, affective reactions, fear, and emotional coping in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A cross-sectional study

Author Identifier

Evalotte Mörelius

ORCID : 0000-0002-3256-5407

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

Pain Management Nursing

Volume

22

Issue

4

First Page

516

Last Page

521

Publisher

Elsevier

School

School of Nursing and Midwifery

RAS ID

32686

Comments

Hanberger, L., Tallqvist, E., Richert, A., Olinder, A. L., Forsner, M., Mörelius, E., & Nilsson, S. (2021). Needle-related pain, affective reactions, fear, and emotional coping in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A cross-sectional study. Pain Management Nursing, 22(4), 516-521. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmn.2021.01.007

Abstract

Background: The self-care of type 1 diabetes (T1D) includes undergoing procedures with needles several times daily, which may cause pain and fear. Aims: The aim was to identify the degree of perceived pain, affective reactions, fear, and emotional coping among children and adolescents with T1D. Design: A cross-sectional survey was performed. Methods: Children and adolescents 7-18 years of age (n = 197) and their parents (n = 123) completed the Coloured Analogue Scale (CAS), the Facial Affective Scale (FAS), the Diabetes Fear of Injection Questionnaire (D-FISQ), and the Faces Emotional Coping Scale (FECS) in relation to needle procedures. Results: The higher the values of the CAS, FAS and D-FISQ scores, the lower values for coping were reported by children and adolescents regarding treatment with insulin pen or pump, blood glucose test, and venipuncture (p < .001). Patients reported strong negative affect regarding insulin injections (35%) and blood glucose tests (32%), as well as negative affect (48%, 69%) and substantial pain (27%, 50%) for inserting a pump needle and venipuncture, respectively. Parents reported significantly higher values than children on all scales and procedures except D-FISQ (blood glucose tests) and FECS (venipuncture). Conclusions: Children and adolescents who perceive greater pain during needle-related procedures have poorer coping ability. Pediatric diabetes teams need to identify those in need of extra support to develop pain coping strategies.

DOI

10.1016/j.pmn.2021.01.007

Access Rights

free_to_read

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Safety and quality in health care

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