Title

Demonstrating the value of early economic evaluation alongside clinical trials: Exercise medicine for men with metastatic prostate cancer

Author Identifier

Daniel A Galvao

ORCID : 0000-0002-8209-2281

Dennis R Taaffe

ORCID : 0000-0001-6381-1597

Robert U Newton

ORCID : 0000-0003-0302-6129

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Title

European Journal of Cancer Care

Volume

30

Issue

5

Publisher

Wiley

School

Exercise Medicine Research Institute / School of Medical and Health Sciences / Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research

RAS ID

36195

Funders

Edith Cowan University Griffith University

Comments

Edmunds, K., Scuffham, P., Reeves, P., Galvão, D. A., Taaffe, D. R., Newton, R. U., . . . Tuffaha, H. (2021). Demonstrating the value of early economic evaluation alongside clinical trials: Exercise medicine for men with metastatic prostate cancer. European Journal of Cancer Care, 30(5), article e13479. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13479

Abstract

Prostate cancer (PCa) patients with bone metastases tend to have significant functional impairment from long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), exacerbated by subsequent treatments such as second-line hormone therapies (abiraterone and enzalutamide), first- and second-line chemotherapy or immunotherapies (Hart et al., 2017). They are at significant risk of falls, fractures and consequent hospitalisation. There is a growing body of evidence to support the effectiveness of exercise in addressing the adverse effects of advanced PCa treatment (Hayes et al., 2019). Despite recommendations for men with bone metastases to participate in supervised exercise, there is often a reticence on the part of clinicians and/or patients due to concerns of fragility fracture or other adverse effects (Hart et al., 2017). These men with significant treatment toxicity and a high disease burden are an important patient group for whom exercise has been demonstrated to improve quality of life (QoL) (Galvão et al., 2018). To inform policy and improve accessibility of exercise for advanced PCa patients, it is important to determine whether such interventions represent value for money.

DOI

10.1111/ecc.13479

Access Rights

subscription content

Research Themes

Health

Priority Areas

Prevention, detection and management of cancer and other chronic diseases

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